The seven deadly sins of the CX transformation journey

Myopia, imbalance, indifference… Here are the seven deadly sins related to establishing a customer experience culture within an organization.

Harald Fanderl

www.mycustomer.com

Category

Customer experience

Measuring and Managing

Article published on

21 September 2017

Myopia, imbalance, indifference… Here are the seven deadly sins related to establishing a customer experience culture within an organization.

The author presents the 7 things to avoid when establishing a customer experience culture within an organization.

  1. Myopia: A number of managers start the transformation process without having a realistic, clear vision of their organization’s future. They prefer to quickly target concrete actions, often in customer experience areas which are not top priorities.
  2. Indifference: Many organizations fail to establish this change because customer experience is not one of the management team’s 3 main priorities, leading to a general lack of support for the project.
  3. Worthlessness: Certain organizations launch these programs without being familiar with the benefits or financial value of the new customer experience, which generally leads to a lack of resources and investment related to the project.
  4. Heedlessness: Many customer experience transformations start by identifying the components that matter the most to the customer relying on the management teams’ perspective rather than the consumers’ (ex.: satisfaction survey).
  5. Imbalance: Some transformations fail because the project loses momentum when few impacts are noticeable over the short term. It is therefore essential to have a balanced portfolio of initiatives (over the long and short terms), to demonstrate success from the start, maintain the rhythm and keep learning over time.
  6. Fractionalism: Some managers have too narrow a view of customer experience, and focus solely on certain aspects of it. Therefore, they end up underestimating the importance of changing in-house cultural even though it is necessary for making that kind of change.
  7. Orthodoxy: Some organizations do not consider the opportunities connected with designing this new customer experience, which, in turn, lessens any chance of alleviating the issues their customers experience.

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